THE NEW SOPEP MANUAL

CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION
1. PREAMBLE
2. REPORTING REQUIREMENTS
2.1. Reporting Requirements Flow Chart
2.2. When to Report
2.2.1. Actual Discharge
2.2.2. Probable Discharge
2.3. Information Required
2.4. Follow-up Reports
2.5. Whom to Contact
3. STEPS TO CONTROL DISCHARGE



3.0 General
“Response Requirements Flowchart”
“Vessel’s Pollution Prevention Team Diagram & Responsibility”
3.0.1 Emergency Response

3.1 Operational Spills
3.1.1 Pipe Leakage
3.1.2 Tank Overflow
3.1.3 Hull Leakage

3.2 Vessel Casualties
3.2.1 Grounding
3.2.2 Collision
3.2.3 Hull Failure
3.2.4 Fire/Explosion
3.2.5 Excessive List
3.2.6 Priority Actions
3.2.7 Containment system failure
3.2.8 Submerged/foundered
3.2.9 Wrecked/stranded
3.2.10 Hazardous vapour release

3.3 Additional Precautions
3.3.1 Stability and Strength
3.3.2 Lightering
3.3.3 Bunkering
3.3.4


4. NATIONAL AND LOCAL CO-ORDINATION

5. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION (NON-MANDATORY)


APPENDICES


LIST OF COASTAL STATE CONTACTS
PORT SPECIFIC INFORMATION
PORT CONTACTS
SHIP OWNER INFORMATION
DAMAGE STABILITY DATA
SUMMARY FLOWCHART
REFERENCES
INITIAL NOTIFICATION
TANK CAPACITIES
DRILL/EXERCISE LOG
CLEAN-UP EQUIPMENT
LIST OF DRAWINGS
LIST OF NATIONAL OPERATIONAL CONTACT POINTS





















INTRODUCTION


This plan is written for the vessel “MV ---------” in accordance with the requirements of Regulation 26 of Annex I & Regulation 16 of Annex II of the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships, 1973, as modified by the Protocol of 1978 relation thereto, IMO Resolution MEPC. 86 (44)”Amendments to the Guidelines for the Development of Shipboard Oil Pollution Emergency Plans” (Adopted on 13 March 2000).

The purpose of this Plan is to guide the Master and Officers on board the ship with respect to the steps to be taken when a pollution incident is occurring, has occurred or is likely to occur.

The Plan contains all information and operational instruction required by the Guidelines. The Plan includes appendices, which contain relevant contact information and details.

This Plan has been approved by the administration and except as provided below, no alteration or revision shall be made without the prior approval of administration.

Changes to Section 5 and the appendices will be required to be approved by administration. The appendices should be maintained up to date by the owners, operators and managers.

This Plan must be regularly reviewed and updated. Revision will be the responsibility of the Management Company., regular reviews will be carried out at interval not exceeding 12 months.

Following any pollution incident or other occurrence for which this Plan has been utilized, there will be a thorough review of its effectiveness.





















VESSEL PARTICULARS


Name MV --------------
Type GENERAL CARGO
Flag ------------
Port of Registry ------------
Call Sign ------------
IMO Number -----------
GRT -----------
NRT -----------
Builder & Year -----------------------------
Owner -----------------------------
Operating Company ----------------------------
Class ----------------------------
DWT --------------------------
Length (m) -----------------------
Breadth (m) -------------------
Depth (m) -----------------
Speed Trails – Service ------------------












1. PREAMBLE

This Plan is available to assist personnel in dealing with an unexpected discharge of oil. The primary purpose of the plan is to set in motion the action necessary to stop or minimize the discharge and to mitigate its effects. Effective planning ensures that the necessary actions are taken in a structured, logical, safe and timely manner.

The plan envisioned by the Regulation 26 of Annex I & Regulation 16 of Annex II to MARPOL 73/78, is intended to be a simple document consists of:

The procedure to be followed by the master or other persons having charge of the ship to report an oil pollution incident based on the IMO Resolution A.851 (20) “General principles for ship reporting systems and ship reporting requirements, including guidelines for reporting incidents involving dangerous goods, harmful substances and/or marine pollutants.”

The list of authorities or persons to be contacted in the event of an oil pollution incident.

A detailed description of the action to be taken immediately by persons onboard to reduce or control the discharge of oil following the incident. It must be therefore be available in a working language or languages understood by the master and the officers. A change in the master and the officers which brings about an attendant change in their working language or languages understood would require the issuance of the plan in the new languages.

The plan clearly underlines the following:
Without interfering with ship owners liability, some coastal states consider that it is their responsibility of define techniques and means to be taken against an oil pollution incident and approve such operations which might cause further pollution, ie., lightening. States are in general entitled to do so under the intervention on the high seas in the cases of oil pollution causalities, 1969.
(Intervention convention)

The procedures and point of contact on the ship for co-coordinating shipboard activities with national and local authorities in combating the pollution.


Chemical agents should not be used in response to pollution on the sea, without authorization of the appropriate coastal state and such authorization should also be requested for use of containment or recovery equipment.










2. REPORTING REQUIREMENTS



2.0 Reporting Requirements Flow Chart


Article 8 and Protocol I of MARPOL 73/78 require that the nearest coastal state should be notified of actual or probable discharges of oil to the sea. The intent of the requirement is to ensure that coastal states are informed without delay of any incident giving rise to pollution, or threat of pollution of the marine environment, as well as the need for assistance and salvage measures, so that appropriate action may be taken.

The reporting procedure to be followed by the Master or other person in charge of the ship after an oil pollution incident is based on guidelines developed by the International Maritime Organization.

If the ship is involved in a pollution incident, reports must be made both to coastal state or port contacts as appropriate, and to contacts representing an interest in the ship.

A flow chart indicating the reporting procedure to be followed in accordance with the MARPOL requirements is given overleaf.
































REPORTING REQUIREMENTS FLOW CHART






Has there been an accident or occurrence of a hazardous event?
Yes No





No report is required

No

Is there a probability of an oil spill
(Refer to Section 2.1.2)

Is there an actual oil spill
(Refer to Section 2.1.1)

No


Yes Yes

A report is required




Is ship in port?



No Yes

Notify nearest coastal state by quickest possible means (use format in Appendix H and refer to Section 2)

Notify nearest coastal state by quickest possible means (use format in Appendix H and refer to Section 2)







Notify Ship Owner/Operator




Mandatory initial reporting action complete

Prepare follow-up reports as practicable















2.1 When to Report


The Master of a ship involved in an accident where there is an actual or probable discharge exceeding the limits established by MARPOL 73/78 should immediately report to the nearest coastal state by the quickest possible means of communication, giving the information required (see Paragraph 2.2) using the format as shown in Appendix H.

The report shall be made when an incident involves:

a. A discharge above the permitted level or probable discharge of oil or of noxious liquid substances for whatever reason including those for the purpose of securing the safety of the ship or for saving life at sea, or
b. A discharge or probable discharge of harmful substances in packed form, including those in freight containers, portable tanks, road and rail vehicles and ship borne barges; or
c. Damage, failure or breakdown of a ship of 15 meters in length or above which:
i. Affect the safety of the ship; including but not limited to collision, grounding fire, explosion, structural failure, flooding and cargo shifting; or
ii. Results in impairment of the safety of navigation; including but not limited to, failure or breakdown of steering gear, propulsion plant, electrical generating system, and essential ship borne navigation aids; or
d. A discharge during the operation of the ship of oil or noxious liquid substances in excess of the quantity or instantaneous rate permitted under the present Convention.


2.1.1 Actual Discharge

A report to the nearest coastal state is required whenever there is:
A discharge of oil above the permitted level for whatever reason including those for the purpose of securing the safety of the ship or for saving life at sea, or
An overboard discharge of oil resulting from damage to the ship or its equipment, or for the purpose of securing the safety of a ship or saving life at sea; or
An overboard discharge of oil in excess of the quantity or instantaneous rate permitted under MARPOL 73/78, caused during the operation of the ship.

Note: Consult Annex I of MARPOL 73/78 and IOPP certificate for detailed information on requirements associated with vessel operation and on how the discharge limits have to be complied with.











2.1.2 Probable Discharge

In order to expedite response and minimize damage from pollution incident, it is essential that appropriate coastal states should be notified without delay. This process is begun with the initial report required by article 8 and protocol I of the convention. In judging whether there is a probable discharge and whether a report should be made, the following factors, as a minimum, should be taken into account:

The nature of the damage, failure or breakdown of the ship, machinery or equipment.
Ship location and proximity to land or other navigational hazards.
Weather conditions, tide, current and sea state.
Traffic density.
Movement of the oil spill and probability to affect the shore.

It is impracticable to lay down precise definitions of all types of situations involving probable discharge, which would warrant an obligation to report. However as a general guideline, the Master should make a report in case of:

Damage, failure or breakdown, which affects the safety of the vessel; examples are collision, grounding, fire explosion, structural failure, flooding, cargo shifting.
Failure of machinery or equipment which affects the safety of navigation; examples are failure or breakdown of generators, essential navigational aids.
Spill resulting from casualties: Casualties should be treated in the plan as a separate section. The plan should include various checklists or other means, which will ensure that the master considers all appropriate factors when addressing the specific casualty. These checklists must be tailored to the specific personnel assignments for anticipated tasks must be identified.

2.2 Information Required

Complete the information format in Appendix H as follows:

AA Ship name, call sign, MMSI, flag
BB Date and time of event, UTC (D-D-H-H-M-M)
CC Position, Lat, Long. (D-d-m-m N/S, d-d-d-m-m- E/W)
Or
DD Bearing, distance from land mark (d-d-d, N mil)
EE True course (d-d-d)
FF Speed, knots (kn-kn-1/10) at the time of the incident
LL Intended track
MM Radio station(s) guarded (VHF, MF SSB, HF SSB)
NN Date and time of next report, UTC (D-D-H-H-M-M)
OO Draft in meters and centimeters
PP Type and quantity of cargo/bunkers on board
QQ Brief details of defects/deficiencies/damage. The condition of the vessel and the availability to transfer cargo bunkers or ballast must be included.
RR Brief details of pollution, including estimate of quantity lost, the type of cargo /fuel, if the discharge is continuing, estimated movement and area of the oil spill.
SS Brief details of weather and sea conditions
TT Contact details of ship’s owner/operator/agent
UU Ship size and type:
Length: (m) Breadth: (m) Depth: (m) Tonnage: Type:
XX Additional information
-brief details of incident
-need for outside assistance
-actions being taken
-number of crew and details of any injuries
-details of P&I Club & local correspondent
-mobile telephone number
-other

2.3 Follow-up Reports
Once the vessel has transmitted an initial report, further reports should be sent at regular intervals to keep those concerned informed of developments.
Follow-up reports to coastal states should always be in the style given in Appendix H, and should include information about every significant change in the vessel’s condition, the rate of the release and spread of oil, weather conditions, and details of agencies notified and clean-up activities.

2.4 Whom to Contact

All communications/notifications should be made preferably by Telex and/or any other possible communications means onboard.

Appendix A lists coastal state contacts.
Appendix B lists of ports frequently visited.
Appendix C lists port contacts.
Appendix D lists owner/operator contacts.

The Master must obtain details concerning local reporting procedures upon arriving in port and complete Appendices B and C.
If an oil spill occurs from the vessel while in port, the Master must immediately activate the appropriate shipboard personnel for clean up and/or mitigating procedures. Notification of local interests is important and shall include:

Terminal/Harbour Authorities.
Agent (fire-fighting, salvage or lightening).
P&I Representative.
Vessels in the vicinity.
Operator (managing company of the vessel) who should notify the following:
Clean-up contractor.
Charterer.
Flag State Authorities.

When an overboard spill occurs or there is the probability of same while the vessel is at sea, the following have to be notified:

Nearest coastal state.
Operator of the vessel.




3. STEPS TO CONTROL DISCHARGE


General

The information provided is to assist personnel in dealing with an unexpected discharge of oil. The primary purpose is to set in motion the necessary actions to stop or minimize the discharge and to mitigate its effects. The Master’s priority is to ensure the safety of personnel and the ship and to take action to prevent escalation of the incident. The Master is in charge of the overall response to an incident.

Each vessel has an onboard organization chart for responding to an emergency. The assigned responsibilities may be determined by the Flag State or by company regulations (see next pages, for Vessel’s Pollution Prevention Team Diagram & Responsibility).

It is therefore important to check that the Station Bill (Crew Muster assignments), firefighting and oil spill response plans accommodate shipboard personnel assignments for an incident involving an unexpected discharge of oil.






























3.0 Emergency Response:

OIL POLLUTION CONTINGENCY - LINES OF REPORTING & RESPONSE



Ship Master





RESPONSE PROCEDURE
(SECTION 3 & 40)

RESPONSE PROCEDURE
(SECTION 2)





PRIMARY CONTACT GOVERNMENT OIL
CARGO
& DESIGNATED & LOCAL
INTEREST SHORE CONTROLLER AUTHORITIES
(GULF OF ADEN SHIPPING CO. LLC) (COAST, FLAG & PORT)


SALVOR CLUB



QUALIFIED PERSON ON-SCENE SUPERINTEDENT

QUALIFIED PERSON ON-SCENE SUPERINTEDENT




CHARTERER’S REPRESENTATIVE

LOCAL REP

LOCAL REP



LOCAL REP


















3.0.1 OFFICE RESPONSE


3.0.1.1 INITIAL RESPONSE

i. Following receipt of initial information, the recipient shall inform the primary or secondary contacts as listed in Table I.

ii. Depending on the severity of the situation, the Fleet Manager will dispatch a Task Force to investigate the incident/accident.

iii. After the first notification of the Emergency the GM will appoint a Designated Shore Controller (usually the Marine Superintendent) and instruct him to take charge. The name of the Controller will be immediately communicated to the Master and this information is to be inserted in the Log Book against the time transmitted.

iv. The Designated Shore Controller shall appraise the information and establish the Office Emergency Response Team if the situation warrants.


3.0.1.2 FUNCTION OF THE OFFICE EMERGENCY RESPONSE TEAM

i. Having assembled the OERT, the first action shall be to establish contact with the vessel to determine current status and ongoing situation through either:
· Telex
· R/T
· W/T
· Fax
· Sat. Com.
· Local Agent.

The OERT shall remain manned, and will act as back up to fulfill the requirements of the Master and Superintendent etc. at the scene of the incident and they shall also be responsible for:

· advising legal
· advising insurance/salvage/P&I
· requesting assistance from Supply/Spares/Personnel
· Repair/Travel departments
· Keeping a strict chronological record in a designated “Incident Log Book”.

A check list of action required by the OERT is given in Table III for guidance.

Within the OERT a Public Relations Person shall be appointed by the Designated Shore Controller. The responsibilities of the PRP shall encompass the following:
Releasing news items (see Appendix 2)
Ensuring unauthorized persons are not allowed to interfere with Company
Personnel engaged in taken corrective action.



TABLE III - CHECK LIST OF ACTIONS REQUIRED BY THE OFFICE
EMERGENCY RESPONSE TEAM


AAA Open communications link

BBB Establish current status

CCC Confirm Official channels are open to:
Government
Pollution Control Organization
P & I Club
Salvage Association
PR

DDD Dispatch task force

EEE Task force leader (appointed by GM)
Survey of scene
Prepare plans
Priority listing
Personnel Safety
Environmental / Property damage
PR/Press release (clear with GM)
PR/Monitor and collect press reports





























3..0.1.3 MANAGEMENT REVIEW PANEL

3.0.1.3.1 The Ship’s Master’s responsibility can only be revoked by a unanimous decision of a Management Review Panel “M.R.P.” which consists of the Fleet Manager, Marine Superintendent and Technical Superintendent of Arabian Tankers Co LLC. Such revocation shall not be effective until it has been communicated to the Master in writing, also giving the name and position of the person on site who will then act as Master. (Writing includes cable, telex or Fax).

3.0.1.3.2 The Master shall not delay making or implementing any decision pending receipt of approval or revocation from the M.R.P.

3.0.2 VESSELS RESPONSE
3.0.2.1 MASTERS AUTHORITY

The Ship’s Master has full authority to deal with any emergency in the manner he thinks best. His authority supersedes all others whether on board the vessel or in the office, this includes any Superintendents/ Marine Superintendent on board the ship.

The Master may offer control of the emergency to Head Office if he decides that the emergency can be more effectively handled from the Office but the Master shall nevertheless remain in control until his offer has been accepted by the Designated Shore Controller and confirmed to him in writing. (Writing includes cable, telex or fax).

The Fleet Manager will then instruct the Designated Shore Controller to take over (with immediate effect) from the Master and this information is to be inserted in the incident Log Book together with the time of handover.

The Master/Designated Store Controller must always engage contractors (Salvors) on a “no cure no pay basis” using Lloyd’s Open Form L.O.F. 1994 or any other agreement based on a “no cure no pay basis”.


3.0.2.2 GUIDELINES TO MASTERS

The Master is expected to seek the advice of:
A. Local Authorities
B. Local Contractors e.g. Salvors as required
C. Fellow Officers
D. Office Personnel including Superintendents or Marine Superintendent who may be on board.

At all times, the Master must ensure that:
Full co-operation is given to Contractors/Salvors
Relevant ship’s plans, instructions manuals and storage plans are freely available to involved parties. However, any other documents shall not be released without further clearance from the Shore Controller.




In addition to normal Log Book entries the following items are also to be recorded in the Deck Log Book as appropriate:
a. The terms on which Salvors/Contractors is engaged
b. Delays to vessel and equipment provided by the Contractor/Salvor.
c. Any action the Master would have taken in the absence of Contractor/Salvor.
d. Any damage to the Master’s ship or its equipment caused by Contractors/Salvors.
e. Help in the form of ship’s crew and equipment given by the Master to Contractors/Salvors.
f. The condition of the vessel and cargo and changes to the situation as occurring.
g. Services rendered by Contractors/Salvors
h. Weather conditions and forecasts
i. What other assistance was available to the Master.

































3.0.2.3 STEPS TO CONTROL OIL DISCHARGE/POLLUTION

Whenever an oil spill occurs it is the duty of the individual finding the spill immediately to inform the Master or responsible officer who in turn shall activate the Ships Pollution Prevention Team by sounding the Emergency Alarm.
FIGURE 3 - GUIDANCE IN THE EVENT OF AN OIL SPILL/POLLUTION


DISCHARGE OF OIL
Probable or actual




ASSESMENT OF THE NATURE OF INCIDENT


ACTION REQUIRED
·1 Alert crew members
·2 Identify and monitor spill response
·3 Personnel Protection
·4 Spill assessment
·5 Vapour monitoring
·6 Evacuation










REPORTING
By master and or Designated Crew Member

When to report
·1 All probable and actual spills
How to report
·2 By quickest means to coastal radio station.
·3 Designated ship movement reporting station or
·4 Rescue co-ordination center (at sea)
·5 By quickest available means to local authorities
Whom to contract
·1 Nearest coastal State
·2 Harbour and terminal operators (in port)
·3 Ship owner's manager; P&I insurance
·4 Head charterer: cargo owner
·5 Refer to contract lists
What to report
·1 Initial report (Res. A. 851 (20))
·2 Characteristics of oil spilled
·3 Cargo/ballast/bunker dispositions
·4 Weather and sea condition
·5 Slick Movement
·6 Assistance required:
ü Salvage
ü Lightening capacity
ü Mechanical equipment
ü External strike team
ü Chemical dispersant/degreasant




ACTION TO CONTROL DISCHARE
Measure to minimize the escaper of oil and treat to the marine environment
Navigational measures
·1 Alter course / position and/or speed
·2 Change of list and/or trim
·3 Anchoring
·4 Initiate towage
·5 Assess safe haven requirements
·6 Weather/tide/swell forecasting
·7 Slick monitoring
·8 Record of events and communications taken Seamanship measures
·1 Safety assessment and precaution
·2 Advice on priority countermeasures
·3 Damage stability and stress considerations
·4 Ballasting / deballasting
·5 Internal cargo / bunker transfer operations
·6 Emergency ship-to-ship transfer of cargo and/or bunker
·7 Set up shipboard responses for:
ü Leak sealing
ü Fire fighting
ü Handling of shipboard response equipment (if available)
ü Additional actions.

STEPS TO INITIATE EXTERNAL RESPONSE
·1 Refer to coastal Port State listing assistance
·2 Refer to ship interest contact list
·3 External clean up resources required
·4 Continued monitoring of activities


3.0.2.4 RESPONSIBILITIES OF SHIPS POLLUTION PREVENTION TEAM

The responsibilities defined below are repeated in the Oil Pollution prevention plan which shall be posted in prominent positions on board the vessel.

MASTER

The Master shall be responsible for the overall charge of any oil pollution prevention response requirements due to operational or casualty incidents. He shall also ensure that the Oil Pollution prevention plan is posted in appropriate positions on board the vessel.
The reporting procedures in section 2 shall be complied with to ensure all appropriate parties are informed. He is to ensure that a log of all associates events is maintained.

CHIEF OFFICER

The Chief Officer shall be responsible for ensuring Team members are given the necessary training in the use of whatever equipment or oil absorbents are on board and instructions in the requirements of the check lists contained in this manual and the oil pollution prevention plan. He shall be in charge of all deck operations on board and keep the Master informed and updated on the situation and the results of any action taken to limit oil outflow. He shall also be responsible for ensuring appropriate fire fighting equipment is made ready for immediate use in addition to the ships Oil Pollution clean-up equipment and material.

RADIO OFFICER

The Radio Officer shall act as secretary to the Master and maintain a log of all events associated without him incident. He shall also be responsible for ensuring all messages transmitted in accordance with the Masters instructions are in the format as defined in section 2 of this manual. (In the absence of a Radio Officer, the Master shall designate any other suitable hand to act as Secretary).

CHIEF ENGINEER

The Chief Engineer shall provide Technical support to the Ships Oil Pollution Prevention Team. He shall ensure that pumps are started as required and that Engine Room and staff on duty are in an alert situation to respond to the requirement of the Master.

SECOND ENGINEER

The second Engineer shall be responsible for ensuring any technical equipment shall be in operation as directed by the Chief Engineer. This shall include all fire fighting pumps, air compressors, hydraulic pumps etc. He shall also direct Engine Room duty staff to make ready Main Engines if necessary.







THE DECK DUTY OFFICER (OR O.O.W. IF AT SEA)

The Deck Duty Officer (or O.O.W. if at sea) shall be responsible for sounding the General Alarm as soon as notified of an actual or possible oil spill. He shall stop all cargo operations and inform the shore Terminal or Bunker Barge as necessary. On no account shall valves be shut against any flow as this may cause a hose to rupture and compound the problem.

CREW MEMEBRS ON WATCH

All crew on watch on deck shall respond to the instructions of the Deck Officer on watch or the Chief Officer when the Ships Oil Spill Response Team is activated.

OFFICERS / CREW NOT ON WATCH

All other officers / crew not on watch shall muster at their Emergency Stations on hearing the General alarm, and shall be directed by the Chief Officer not on watch according to the requirements of the situation.

































“RESPONSE REQUIREMENTS FLOW CHART”
This flow diagram is only intended to highlight the operational and casualty scenarios which are contained in the plan. Guidelines are provided for each scenario for use by shipboard personnel. As guidelines, they are not intended to be all inclusive and therefore can be supplemented when optimizing a response most appropriate for the particular incident and vessel design.




Has there been an incident?
Yes

Yes


Is there a probability of an overboard oil spill?

Is there an overboard discharge of oil



Yes No No Yes

Is there an overboard discharge of oil



Activate alarm and implement onboard Emergency Procedures most appropriate for the particular circumstances







Identify source of oil spill

Identify cause(s) producing risk




§1 Determine response in order of priority to safeguard personnel and minimize threat to the marine environment.
§2 Make report(s) as necessary



System/Operational

Pip leakage
Tank overflow
Hull leakage

Vessel Casualty

Grounding, Collision, Hull Failure,
Fire/Explosion,
Excessive List, Containment system failure, submerged/foundered, Wrecked/stranded, Hazardous vapour release
















“VESSEL’S POLLUTION PREVENTION TEAM DIAGRAM”
















































STEPS TO CONTROL DISCHARGE


General Responsibilities

The available crew members onboard would be assigned the following Ranks and corresponding Duties.


RANK DUTIES
Master Overall in charge of the operation onboard. Report incident as required. Act as owner’s representative. He informs:

Terminal/Harbour Authorities
Agent (fire-fighting, clean-up contractor, salvage or lightering)
P & I Representative
Operator (managing company of the vessel)
Vessels in the vicinity
Radio
Operator Secretary to Master. Transmit and receive reports as ordered by the Master. Keep log of all events and progress (if not the Radio Operator, the Chief Steward will fill this position).
Chief Officer He will plan the role of Oil Pollution Control Officer and also be in charge of deck operations. Shall keep Master informed and updated on the situation and the results from action taken to limit outflow. Mobilize Oil Pollution Prevention Team to limit the Oil Spill and to start the clean up operations.
Chief
Engineer In charge of fuel transfer operation. Organize onboard clean-up equipment. Take action as directed by the Master, or Oil Pollution Control Officer.
Deck Duty
Officer Alert and inform Chief Officer and Master of situation. In the event of oil spilled on deck, he will instruct the Terminal/Barge personnel to immediately cease operations and inform the Chief Engineer. Mobilize fire-fighting squad, as needed, when Chief Officer takes charge on deck. Mobilize off duty crew as necessary.
Fitter/Pump
man/
Electrician Assist Chief Engineer. Limit outflow by operating pumps/valves. Recover free flowing oil on deck by operating relevant pumps.
Duty
Engineer Assist Chief Engineer. Prepare for fire fighting. Mobilize on duty/off duty engine ratings as necessary.
Duty
Deck/Engine If oil leakage is detected alert the Duty Officer immediately. Prepare for Pollution Control action. Take action to prevent any oil from reaching the railing.


Note: General Arrangement, Capacity Plan, Midship Section, Tank tables, Piping diagrams and records containing information on current quantities/specification of bunker and ballast shall be kept in the Master’s Office(SEE APPENDIX M).







3.1 Operational Spills

When an unexpected overboard discharge of oil occurs, such as during bunkering, operations should be stopped immediately. Cessation operations may require activation of shut down devices and sound signals. All necessary actions for operational spills must be taken by the Chief Engineer and his assigned personnel.


3.1.1 Pipe Leakage

Pipe leakage will generally occur when pressurized. Possible reasons can be:

Corrosion.
Over pressure due to incorrect line up or mechanical failure of valves.
Coupling failure between pipe lengths.

The first action is to stop the transfer operation either by ship or shore action.

The amount of leakage can be controlled by either:

Isolating the affected piping by block valve closure, or
Opening a loading valve into an empty bunker tank, or
Relieving the pressure into a tank which has sufficient allege to allow gravity transfer.

If the oil volume on deck is such that there is free flowing oil accumulating in way of the deck scuppers, then to prevent or minimize the oil going overboard, it may be necessary to use absorbent material and other oil clean-up (response) equipment (see Appendix L) to collect oil for eventual disposal ashore.


Notes:

Refer to Section 2 on Reporting Requirements which must be made if oil goes overboard.
If pipe leakage occurs in the machinery space the volume of oil or water collected in the bilge will require discharge into the bilge slop tank or other appropriate tank.
Any oil contaminated material accumulated from the clean-up operation may require special handling and disposal procedures dictated by state requirements. The local agent should be consulted if material is being sent ashore.









3.1.2 Tank Overflow

Tank overflow will generally occur because of the following:

Human error when “topping off” bunker tanks.
Pipeline failure within a bunker tank when full and with internal lines under pressure.
Valve leakage due to mechanical defect or improper close.
Incorrect reading from tank gauging equipment.
Bunkering in excess of anticipated rate.

Whatever the cause, the first action is to stop the transfer operation either by ship or shore action. While pump(s) are stopping, the overflow can be reduced by:

Opening tank(s), valve(s) to allow gravity flow from overflowing tank to tank(s) with available space.
Closure of appropriate isolating valves around affected tank.

If the oil volume on deck is such that there is free flowing oil accumulating in way of the deck scuppers, then to prevent or minimize the oil going overboard, it may be necessary to use absorbent material and other oil clean-up (response) equipment (see Appendix L) to collect oil for eventual disposal ashore.

Notes:

Refer to section 2 on Reporting Requirements, which must be made if oil goes overboard.
Any oil-contaminated material accumulated from the clean-up operation may require special handling and disposal procedures dictated by state requirements. The local agent should be consulted if material is being sent ashore.

3.1.3 Hull Leakage

Possible sources for hull leakage are welded seams and cracks in hull plating due to fatigue or stress. Oil leakage can occur above or below the waterline.

When oil sheen is observed around the vessel, bunkering operations should be stopped immediately. Shore side personnel must be informed that the necessary response can be implemented. The appropriate agencies should be notified and the following considered:

Above Waterline

If the source of oil is determined to be above the water line, the first action is to reduce the head of the oil below the leak.

Depending on the location of the leak, it may be necessary to bring the oil level below the water line. Such a reduction is possible by gravity to an empty or slack tank or by pumping internally to an appropriate tank with sufficient spare volume or by pumping to ashore tankage or barge.



Underwater

If the source of oil leak from the hull is below the water line, identification of the compartment may prove difficult due to tidal and current conditions. When the source is identified, any deck openings, e.g. ventilation pipes, filling lines or sounding tubes on the damaged tank should be closed to hermetically seal the tank and avoid further release of oil overboard.

If divers are unable to identify the source of the underwater leak, then to the extent possible, the oil level should be reduced in tanks nearest to the source. That may be possible through internal transfer to other tanks, or, if along side a terminal, pumped ashore. Depending on the circumstances and the amount of leakage, it may be possible to obtain permission for a diver’s inspection before reducing the oil level. This would be beneficial for determining the exact location of the problem and repair requirements. Use or availability of a containment boom would facilitate acceptance for such a proposal.

In either case, whatever action is being planned to control the oil leak, it should only be after determining that shear and bending moments and stability are maintained within acceptable limits by contacting the Operator’s Head Office.

The expectation is that the oil spill contractor will, where appropriate, respond to the spill and be familiar with disposal requirements for any recovered oil.

3.2 Vessel Casualties

In responding to a casualty, the priority is to ensure the safety of personnel and the vessel. Appropriate action should be taken as dictated by the nature of the casualty. Control and containment are important objectives when planning to mitigate damage to the marine environment. The steps to control discharge have been identified for each of the following scenarios described in 3.2.1 to 3.2.10 below. Intended as guidelines, they may be excessive or not all inclusive in optimizing the response most appropriate for the particular type of incident, circumstances or vessel design. Different onboard decisions may therefore be necessary. The overall responsibility of an incident is taken by the Master of the vessel.

3.2.1 Grounding Action Check List

Master/Watch Officer
If applicable, inform towing tug to stop forward motion until soundings have been taken.

Chief Engineer
To minimize oil outflow, hermetically seal all damaged bunker tanks by closing vents (important when large tidal range).

Note: To avoid tank implosion, pumping of liquid can only be done in tanks not sealed from the atmosphere.





Deck Officer

Take soundings around vessel to determine area of contact.

Deck Officer/Bosun
As appropriate visually check or take soundings in all void spaces to determine if damaged. If confirmed, record allege for use in calculations.

Chief Engineer
Take measurements in bunker tanks and compare with departure or last recorded on passage. Estimate any loss.

Master
While damage assessment in progress, obtain vessel position and observe for any movement. It may be necessary to request the towing tug to hold the vessel in position. Such action will depend on the extent of damage causing loss of buoyancy.

Master/Chief Engineer
Consideration should be given to shear forces, bending moments and stability before transferring any cargo ballast or bunkers. Consult with Operator’s Head Office (see Appendix D & E) who can provide damage stability information and propose/agree to a float-off plan. Alternatively, salvage assistance may be necessary.

Master
Consolidate visual inspection findings, measurements of liquid in compartments, water depths and weather information as a ready reference to assist shore personnel in developing/confirming action plan. Prepare the Initial notification report and transmit (see appendix H). The following Safety Considerations are Important

Watch Officer
At time of incident, ring general alarm and inform all personnel of situation.

Watch Officer/Chief Engineer
Observe oil movement on water surface. If it is in way of engine room intakes, pumps may have to be stopped or change suction to opposite side. Decide if high or low suction is preferable.

Watch Officer
All life saving equipment, including lifeboats to be prepared for emergency use.

Watch Officer
Monitor hydrocarbon content of atmosphere on deck to determine any personnel protection or need to shut off ventilation intakes.









3.2.2 Collision Action Check List


Vessels Separate – No Fire

Watch Officer
Ring general alarm; muster personnel at emergency stations; advise action plan; and determine any missing or injured.

Master/Watch Officer
Ascertain extent of damage. Prepare the Initial notification report and transmit (see appendix H).

Watch Officer/Watch Engineer
If vapours present on deck, close ventilation intakes for accommodation and engine room.

Chief Officer
Confirm all external and internal watertight and weather tight doors are secured to minimize the vessel’s susceptibility to any water ingress.

Master
Communicate with other vessel to determine name and if any assistance required.

Master
Notify vessels in the vicinity and, if necessary, request to stand-by.

Chief Officer
If circumstances dictate, prepare all emergency equipment.

Chief Engineer
Observe if there is any oil movement on the water surface, then decide which pump intakes to be used in the engine room.

Master
Review options for corrective measures and, if necessary, contact Operator’s Head Office (see Appendices D & E) for damage stability information.

Chief Officer/Chief Engineer
Close allege lid on all tanks damaged below the waterline to hermetically seal the tank and control any outflow of oil.

Note: To avoid tank implosion, pumping of liquid can only be done in tanks not sealed from the atmosphere.





Vessel Locked – No Fire

(In addition to the forgoing, the following additional items should be considered.)

Master
If circumstances permit; consider remaining locked until stability of each vessel has been determined.

Master
Consider spraying water at point of contact between vessels to protect against ignition from metal contact due to movement from sea/swell.

Master/Chief Engineer
Any transfer of liquids to control oil leak should, whenever possible, be aimed at maintaining same trim and heel to help prevent unplanned separation.

Master
Once separated, consider risk of sinking for either vessel. Prepare plan for abandon ship (weather, damage and distance from nearest port will be determining factors).

Master
Tug(s) may be required to continue voyage, prepare plan for taking tow line.
Distribution of weights may be necessary to minimize hull stresses.

3.2.3 Hull Failure Action Check List

Watch Officer
Ring general alarm and inform crew of action plan.

Master
Depending on circumstances, advice towing tug, if applicable, to select heading and minimum speed to minimize any hull deflections.

Chief Engineer
Observe surrounding water for oil movement in way of engine room intakes. It may be necessary to change over suctions to a location free from oil.

Master
If oil leak above waterline, transfer to empty or slack tank(s) by gravity or pumping. Shear and bending moments shall remain within acceptable levels, if necessary; contact Operator’s Head Office (see Appendices D&E) for damage stability information. Prepare the Initial notification report and transmit (see appendix H).

Deck Officer
If oil leaks below water line hermetically seal damaged tank(s) by closing allege lid for each damaged tank to control the outflow of oil.

Note: To avoid tank implosion, pumping of liquid can only be done in tanks not sealed from the atmosphere.


Chief Officer
Confirm all external and internal watertight doors are secured to minimize the vessel’s susceptibility to additional water ingress.

Chief Engineer
Take measurements to determine appropriate oil loss.

Master
Weight distribution to be as advised from residual strength and damage stability analysis. Consult with Operator’s Head Office (see Appendices D&E) for stability information.]

Master
Decide whether necessary, if applicable, to remain under tow and how to proceed to port of refuge. If necessary, prepare plan for securing an additional tow.

Chief Officer/Chief Engineer
Continue observing liquid levels in bunker tanks for any change in structural integrity.

3.2.4 Fire/Explosion Action Check List
Duties and responsibilities are detailed on the vessel’s Fire and Emergency Station Bill.

Watch Officer
Sound fire alarm as required in emergency plan.

Chief Officer
Muster personnel at designated stations; complete roll call. Determine extent of any injuries. Provide onboard medical attention or obtain advice from shore by radio/SATCOM.

Deck Officer
Close air intakes to accommodation.

Master/Chief Officer
Make priority to control fire using appropriate equipment and personnel.

Master/Chief Officer
As circumstances permit, isolate vent lines from tank(s) on fire.

Master
Transmit position and request assistance from vessels in the vicinity. Prepare the
Initial notification report and transmit (see appendix H).

Chief Officer
Confirm EPIRB intact for release as designed.




Master
If possible, maneuver vessel to put wind across deck or from quarter to take flame and vapours away from vessel.

Master/Chief Officer
Once fire extinguished, assess structural damage.

Master
Determine if safe to get underway when fire extinguished. If affirmative, any speed restriction, weight distribution for hog or sag preference, weather or heading limitations, or distance from nearest port which will accept vessel all have to be taken into account.

Master
May require salvage tug for escort to tow.

Master
Notify the appropriate authorities on spill Emergency response service at the most convenient time during the emergency. (See Appendix C, D&E)

Master
If circumstances dictate, prepare to abandon ship.

3.2.5 Excessive List Action Check List

Watch Officer
Ring general alarm and advice personnel of action plan.

Master/Watch Officer
Stop the vessel and determine source of oil leak or water ingress.

Watch Officer
Confirm all watertight doors closed.

Chief Officer/Chief Engineer
If necessary, close ventilation intakes for engine room and accommodation.

Chief Officer
All emergency equipment prepared.

Master
Notify vessels in vicinity to stand-by. Notify the appropriate authorities on spill Emergency response at the most convenient time during the emergency. (See Appendix C, D&E). Prepare the Initial notification report and transmit (see appendix H).






Chief Officer/Chief Engineer
Observe for any oil movement on water surface to decide which pump intakes should be used in engine room.

Master
Review options for corrective measures and contact Operator’s Head Office for damage stability information.

Master
Refer to onboard stability information and permissible stresses when moving liquids.

Master/Chief Engineer
If corrective measure limited and potential for abandoning vessel, plan orderly shut down of engine room equipment.

Master
If lightering operation deemed necessary, prepare action plan (see Paragraph 3.3.2)

Master
If tow required, prepare action plan for making fast.

3.2.6 Priority Actions Check List
Priority is to ensure the safety of personnel and the ship.
Ascertain extent of damage condition/disposition of vessel’s loading characteristics and prepare action plan.
Circumstances will vary, but do not hesitate to call for assistance from other vessels and tug if deemed necessary.
Inform authorities/operator of incident details when oil spill occurred, involved giving best estimate of quantities.
Take all possible preventive or mitigation measures appropriate for the incident:
o Stop oil leak by internal transfer if possible.
o Secure ventilation to prevent vapours entering accommodation and engine room.
o When transferring cargo, always determine if shear and bending moments are within acceptable limits. If the integrity of the hull is affected, requested assistance from Operator’s Head Office for damage stability information.
o Observe oil movement on water; change over pump suctions or manoeuvre, if possible, to keep oil away from intakes.
o Consider need to move to a location to provide shelter or away from a sensitive area.
o In adverse weather and hull damaged, consider the vessel heading relative to the wind/swell to minimize hull deflections.
o In case of fire maneuver the vessel if possible to put the wind across the deck and away from the accommodation and machinery spaces.
o Hermetically seal off any damaged tanks by closing the appropriate valves/deck openings to prevent further release of oil.




3.2.7 Containment system failure Action checklist

Watch Officer
Ascertain extent of damage. Prepare the Initial notification report and transmit (see Appendix H).

Master
Review options for corrective measures and, if necessary, contact Operator's Head Office (see Appendices D & E) for damage information.

Chief Engineer
Review options for repair measures if possible or for minimizing the effect of failure.


3.2.8 Submerged/foundered Action Check List

Deck Officer
As appropriate, visually check all spaces to determine damaged.

Chief Engineer
Take measurements in tanks and Estimate any loss.

Master
While damage assessment in progress, obtain vessel position and observe for any movement. It may be necessary to request the towing tug to hold the vessel in position. Such action will depend on the extent of damage.

Master/Chief Engineer
Consideration should be given to shear forces, bending moments and stability. Consult with Operator's Head Office (see Appendix D & E) who can provide damage stability information and propose/agree to a float-off plan. Alternatively, salvage assistance may be necessary.

Master
Consolidate visual inspection findings, measurements of liquid in compartments, water depths and weather information as a ready reference to assist shore personnel in developing / confirming action plan. Prepare the Initial notification report and transmit (see appendix H).

3.2.9 Wrecked/stranded Action Check List

Watch Officer
Ring general alarm; muster personnel at emergency stations; advise action plan; and determine any missing or injured.

Master/Watch Officer
Ascertain extent of damage. Prepare the Initial notification report and transmit (see appendix H).


Chief Officer
Confirm all external and internal watertight and weather tight doors are secured to minimize the vessel's susceptibility to any water ingress.

Master
Communicate with other vessel to determine name and assistance required.

Master
Notify vessels in the vicinity and, if necessary, request to stand-by.

Chief Officer
If circumstances dictate, prepare all emergency equipment.

Master
Review options for corrective measures and, if necessary, contact Operator's Head Office (see Appendices D & E) for damage information.

Master
If circumstances permit, consider remaining locked until stability of each vessel has been determined.

Master
Consider spraying water at point of contact between vessels to protect against ignition from metal contact due to movement from sea/swell.

Master
Once separated, consider risk of sinking for either vessel. Prepare plan for abandon ship (weather, damage and distance from nearest port will be determining factors).


3.2.10 Hazardous vapour release Action Check List

Watch Officer
Sound alarm as required in emergency plan.

Chief Officer
Muster personnel at designated stations; complete roll call. Determine extent of any damage.

Deck Officer
Close air intakes to accommodation.

Master/Chief Officer
Make priority to control vapour using appropriate equipment and personnel.

Master/Chief Officer
As circumstances permit, isolate vent lines from tank(s).




Master
Transmit position and request assistance from vessels in the vicinity. Prepare the Initial notification report and transmit (see appendix H).

Chief Officer
Confirm EPIRB intact for release as designed.

Master
If possible, manoeuvre vessel to put wind across deck or from quarter to take and vapours away from vessel.

Master
May require salvage tug for escort to tow.

Master
Notify the appropriate authorities on hazardous vapour release at the most convenient time during the emergency. (See Appendix C, D&E).

Master
If circumstances dictate, prepare to abandon ship.






























3.3 Additional Precautions

3.3.1 Stability and Strength Considerations

Onboard equipment for calculating shear and bending moments is generally designed to provide results for the undamaged vessel. In a damaged condition when hull integrity has been affected, any transfer of liquids has to be carefully evaluated given the potential impact on longitudinal strength and stability. Actions to mitigate the spillage of oil for a damaged vessel or free the vessel when aground, requires the involvement of Operator’s Head Office (see Appendices D&E) who has access to the appropriate vessel plans and can execute the necessary damage stability calculations. In order to have a timely response in an emergency, plans and data needed should also be available to the head office technical department.

3.3.2 Lightering

If the vessel sustains extensive structural damage, it may be necessary to transfer all or part of the bunkers to another vessel. The following ship to ship transfer of bunkers checklist should be taken into account:

Decide if lightering is to be done at anchor or while underway.
Select location taking into account shelter, traffic density, water depth and anchorage.
Determine type of vessel to be used and plan approach manoeuvre requirements.
Establish which vessel will deploy the fenders to cover the parallel body.
Confirm deck machinery is operational and uses the best mooring lines.
Develop mooring arrangement and discuss with the appropriate personnel.
Maintain safety precautions during the bunker transfer operation.
Discuss the unmooring sequence and inform the appropriate personnel.
The lightening activities has to be carried out by the master as per the guidance given by the plan for mitigating activities as per MEPC.86 (44) ensuring safety of both ships & personnel overboard.

Any lightering operation should be coordinated with the coastal state having jurisdiction over the incident.

3.3.3 Bunkering

The following precautions prior to, during and upon completion of bunkering shall be ensured by the Master and the Chief Engineer.

Before Bunkering

Bunkering procedures are pre-planned and understood by the personnel engaged.
Communications and Alarm tests are established. An alternative system shall be provided.
The amount of oil to be received can be safely accommodated in the available tank spaces.
All sea and overboard valves connected to the bunker system are closed.

Overboard scuppers are plugged. Drip trays are in position below connections and air vents.
Dry absorbent materials are readily available.
International Bunkering Signal is applied by day or night. Adequate lighting for night operation is provided.
Hoses are in good condition and properly connected/secured.
Overflow tanks contents are lowered prior to bunkering. Shut Down procedures are prepared.
Fire fighting equipment is made ready at appropriate positions.
Piping system is lined up correctly and appropriate valves are opened.

After checking all of the above, notify the terminal /barge to commence bunkering.


During Bunkering

Bunker hoses and connections are not leaking.
Pressure is relieved on tanks being topped up, either by slowing down the rate of the incoming bunkers or controlled opening up to the next tank(s) to be loaded.
Closing down against the incoming bunkers is absolutely avoided, unless the facility/barge staffs gives permission.
Ample warnings are given to the terminal/barge during the final stages of bunkering and before the final notification for the interruption of the flow.
Ample allege space is left in the last tank loaded, to allow for draining of the hoses and for relief of the air locks in the system.

Upon completion of Bunkering

Hoses are drained before disconnecting.
Bunker system valves are closed.
Hoses are blank flanged or otherwise sealed before being removed.
Bunker system connections are blank flanged as soon as hoses are disconnected.
Fuel sounding of all fuel oil tanks has been taken. Ample space for expansion is available.


NOTE:

PROCEDURES AS SET OUT ABOVE DO NOT CONSTITUTE AN EXCLUSIVE AND EXHAUSTIVE INSTRUCTION MANUAL. SITUATIONS SHOULD BE INDIVIDUALLY ASSESSED AND DEALT WITH IN THE MOST EFFICIENT MANNER.










4. NATIONAL AND LOCAL CO-ORDINATION


When oil pollution occurs, the Master maintains his primary responsibility for the safety of the crew and the vessel, however prompt notification to the appropriate authorities is important (see Appendix A for a list of coastal state contacts).

The roles and response of local authorities varies, but is facilitated by co-ordination between the ship and shore at the time the incident occurs. In some locations, a government agency will take charge of the response while at others; the initiating response is placed on the ship owner. Clean-up contractors vary in response, capability, fee structures and formalities for agreeing to activate equipment. The appointed agent for the vessel is a valuable resource in providing information to the Master or response resources and local requirements associated with clean-up activities, particularly to ensure compliance with regulations and notifications.


4.1 Coastal State Response to Pollution Incident

A lot of coastal states have established marine pollution response activities in order to protect the environment. Therefore, the coastal state contact is absolutely essential in order to mobilize response resources for pollution containment, removal and other assistance. The principle liaison with the national and local authorities, until the representative of the owner or operator arrives, is the Master of the vessel. It is imperative that all factual information required by the coastal state authorities is transmitted promptly and accurately.

The Master’s priority, in case of an incident, is to ensure that the situation on his vessel is under control and that the source of pollution or threat of pollution is correctly identified, that all necessary actions have been initiated to control or mitigate the actual or probable pollution incident and to minimize danger to the vessel if a casualty has occurred.

The coastal state has to advise the Master which resources have been activated and identify what information or assistance is needed from the vessel.

When the coastal state provides the pollution response, the Master is responsible for the safety of his crew and vessel and has to stop the source of pollution or initiate corrective action for any casualty, and has to co-operate fully with the national and local authorities.

In case that the Master requires additional information he should contact the Operating Company.










4.2 The Vessel Responds to a Pollution Incident

In the United States of America and a few other coastal states, the vessel (its owner and operator) is responsible for not only notifying the national and local authorities, but is also responsible for the spill responses.

This requirement obliges the Master, or his agents, to make necessary arrangements to provide the contractors and equipment for the containment of spill, removal of the oil from the water, cleaning up damaged shoreline or resources.

In addition to the safety of the vessel, it is the Master’s responsibility, to be in charge of the spill response operations until relieved by a representative of the Operation Company.

When possible, the Owning/Operating Company will have arranged in advance for an “Emergency Operations Coordinator” who will ensure the proper spill response is carried out, so that the Master and crew are free to handle the various problems on the vessel.

4.2.1The Emergency Operations Coordinator will ensure that:

· Proper notifications have been made and qualified response contractors are engaged.
· Effective liaison with national or local authorities is established.
· Public affairs matters are handled in the best interests of the vessel.
· Co-ordination with the P&I Club, operators and owners is maintained.
· All support necessary for the crew and vessel is arranged.

4.2.2Shoreside spill Response Coordinator or Qualified Individual

Guidance for the master for requesting and coordinating initial response actions with the person responsible for mobilizing shore side response personnel equipment.

4.2.3Planning Standards

To facilitate forethought about the amount of response resources, which should be requested, possible scenarios should be analyzed and accordingly planned for.


















5. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION (NON-MANDATORY)

Information for this section is at the Owners or Operators discretion and is not required by Regulation 26 of MARPOL 73/78 Annex 1 & Regulation 16 of Annex II. This section contains information, which would assist the Master when responding to an emergency and may include the following:

Response Equipment:

An inventory of ship specific equipment for pollution response can be a useful reference for shipboard personnel (see Appendix L). Consideration should be given to training and maintenance in order to ensure the safe and effective use of such equipment. Reference to the use of chemicals is important, given the restrictions by local and national authorities. The response equipment is used such that it is used without interfering with ship owner’s liability that the equipment used prevents the further oil pollution.

Public Affairs:

Interaction with the media during an emergency is important. The Master should not respond to the media and he should refer to the Operator’s Spill Coordinator (who will be assigned by the Head Office) on scene or in Head Office.

Record Keeping:

Keeping records is very important given the potential third party enquiries and investigation following an incident. The Master should keep appropriate records including all actions taken and all communications with the outside authorities and unbowed parties. In addition he should take photographs and samples of the spill.

Plan review:

Regular review of the plan by the Owner, Operator or Master is recommended to ensure that information is kept up to date. A procedure should be developed which allows for incorporating changes into the plan on a timely basis.

After having had to use the plan in response to an incident, its effectiveness should be evaluated by the Owner or Operator and modified if necessary to take account of any lessons learned. The plan review is conducted at least once, yearly.

Plan Familiarity/Drills/Exercises:

To be successful, personnel have to be familiar with the requirements of this plan. Training is therefore important and shall be performed at least once every three months and shall be reported (see Appendix K). The records shall be kept in a file for a period of at least three years.





Response contractors & salvage

Ship side spill response coordinator or qualified Individual: Guidance for the master for requesting and coordinating initial response actions with the persons responsible for mobilizing shore side response personnel and equipment.

Some coastal states require ships to have contracts with “response contractors” when ships enter into such states ports. When ships sail towards such states it is recommended that response (personnel and equipment) and capabilities are identified in advance for each potential port state. In other states, in particular, those referred to in paragraph 1.4.7, such requirements do not exist in general.

Planning standards: To facilitate forethought about the amount of response resources, which should be requested? Possible scenarios should be analyzed and accordingly planned for.

Salvage: The plan should contain information on what the crew responsibilities are in casualty where a vessel is partially or fully disabled, and what constitutes dangerous conditions. A decision process should be outlined in the plan that will aid the master in determining when the salvage assistance should be obtained. The decision process should include, but not be limited to the following:

Nearest land or hazard to navigation
Vessels set and drift
Location and time of impact with hazard based on vessels set and drift
4.Estimated time of casualty repair
Determine the nearest capable assistance and its response time. When a casualty occurs to vessel underway that reduces its maneuverability, the master needs to determine his window of opportunity considering the response time of assistance, regardless of the estimated time of repair. It would not be prudent to hesitate in calling for assistance when the time needed to repair something goes beyond the window of opportunity.






















APPENDIX A

CONTACTS
1. PRESS RELEASE

(i) U.A.E FAX NO. TEL. NO.

Ministry of Communication (971) 2 6651691 (971)26651900

PRESS

Khaleej Times (971) 4 3383345 (971) 4 3382400
Gulf News (971) 4 3441627 (971)43447100


(ii) WORLD

SINGAPORE

Ministry of Communications (65) 270 7988
Marine Operations Centre (65) 375 6231 (65)375 6228

THE SINGAPORE PRESS HOLDINGS

ENGLISH NEWSPAPER

The Straits Times (65) 732 0131 (65)737 8700
Business Times (65) 732 0131 (65)733 5271
The New Paper (65) 734 7711 (65)737 5375

FAX NO. TLX NO. TEL.NO.

USA (NEW YORK)
MARINE LOG 212-633 1165 212-620 7200

LONDON
CBS 44 71-581 4431 916319 4471-581 801
REUTERS 44 71-583 7669 23222 4471-250 122
F.T. 44 71-8733076 9922186 4471-873 000
EXT. 4087
LLOYD’S LIST 44 71-250 0744 97321 4471-250 500
EXT. 437
PLATTS NEWS 44 81-545 6172 265483 4481-545 100








ITALY
LA STAMPA 11-655 306 221121 11-65 681
IL CORRERE DELLE SERA 310031 02-6353
IL CIORNALE 27-202 3859 333279 02-85661
LA REPUBLICA 64-982 2923 613005 06-49821

FRANCE
LE MONDE 140-652 599 206 806 140-652 525
LE FIGARO 142-216 405 211112 142-216 200
LE PROVENCIAL 91-844 995 440805 91-844 545

NETHERLANDS
DE TELEGRAF 31 20-585 2116 12208 3120-859111

PRESS RELEASE
DAILY TIMES 26346 900 850/9
THE GUARDIAN 522 2027 27188 5240890/52411

KOREA
DONG-A IL BAO 273 47742 23627 272 17114
JOONG-ANG DAILY TIMES 273 51652 23224 275 15114
KYUSGHYANG SHINMUN 273 76362 2730 5151

JAPAN
ASAHI SHINBUN 813-354 0131
MAINICHI SHINBUR SHA 913-321 62574 813-321 0321

YOMIURI SHINBUN 813-324 2111

BAHRAIN
GULF DAILY NEWS (ENGLISH) 622141 8565 382400
AKHBAR AL KAHLEEJ 624325 8565 620111
ALAYAM 729009 727111

EGYPT
AL-AHRAM 745888 20185/92544














2. INSURANCE


P & I CLUB

TERRE NOVA PROTECTION & INDEMNITY AGENCY, LONDON
Tel : 0044 (0) 20 79536000
Fax : 0044 (0) 20 79536139








































3. TOWAGE

TOWAGE COMPANIES PARTICULARS


PRINCESS MARINE NL. TEL : (31)2550-12183
NANG HALFWEEG -550 12183
58 VONDELLAAN FAX : (31) 2550 - 36718
1985 BB DRIEHUIS
THE NETHERLANDS

MARINE (OFFSHORE TEL: 081 398 9833
SERVICES) UK FAX: 081 398 1618
STAG COURT TLX: 914071 MARINT G
16 HIGH STREET
THAMES DITTON
SURREY KT7 OSD

SEA SERVIES LTD. MALTA TEL: 776684/775203/773305
KORDIN INDUSTRIAL ESTATE FAX: 776684
KORDIN - PAOLA TLX: 837 SESERV MW
MALTA

SWIRE PACIFIC OFFSHORE TEL: 971- 4-3457515 (24 HRS. CONTACT)
GAC BUILDING TLX: 46839 SWIRE EM
Near PORT RASHID FAX: 971 - 4 - 3457241
P.O.BOX 8127 PIC : MR. PAUL BUNDY
DUBAI
U.A.E
16 RAFFLES QUAY 00 33-03
HONG LEONG BUILDING
SINGAPORE 0104
TEL: 2234055
TLX: RS 23280 SWIRE

E.M.T TEL: 3172 158202 M. TROMP
INTERNATIONAL TRADE TLX: 57041 EMCLNL M DE REUVER
CENTRE FAX: 31 72 158205
NOORDERKADE 2K
1823 CJ ALKMAAR
ROTTERDAM
THE NETHERLANDS

WIJSMULLER TEL: 2550-62666 (24 HRS)
COBUS VAN DERVEEN: 2518-57497
SLUISPLEIN 34 FAX: 2550-18695 (24 HRS)
NICK STOOP: 1804 - 2324
1975 AG IJMUIDEN TLX: 41110
LAND: 2943-3067



P.O.BOX 510
1970 AM IJMUIDEN
HOLLAND DUBAI DE WEERS : 435154
TEL: 420314 RENE MEULEMAN: 457209

LOUCAS G MATASAS TEL: 4520084/4529128 L MATSAS: 8941037
16 BOTSARI /4520132 G MATSAS: 8946107
185 38 PIRAEUS FAX: 4522025
TLX: 212250

LONDON
TEL: 71 6290657/6295818
SEMCO SALVAGE TEL; 2650177/2650692 DAVID LEI -
4743523
JURONG TOWN FAX: 2644190 DAVID CHEN-
2500213
P.O.BOX 127 TLX: RS21352/RS23393 ALAN BOND
7754232
JURONG SEMSAL E.B.CHUA -
4563646
SINGAPORE 9161
59 SHIPYARD ROAD ISMAEL-5605325
JURONG CAPT CHUA-
4671875
SINGAPORE 2262 DON FOO -
2598220
TEHERAN
TEL: 682177
SMIT INTERNATIONAL TEL: 7796911 (24 HRS) RICHARD TEO
B.C.
SINGAPORE PTE LTD. FAX: 7791944
15 WESY COAST HIGHWAY TLX: RS23456 SALVORS 00 04-08
CABLE: SMITTVG
SINGAPORE 0511
SMIT INTERNATIONAL TEL : 010-4549911 VAN DER DOCK
10-610771
NEDERLAND BV FAX : 4549268 YAP BRONSVELDT
1883-15457
1 ZALMSTRAAT TLX : 22222 SMIT NL KOFFERMAN
1889-16772
3016 DS ROTTERDAM BONZER
071-720272









STEWART AND HAZELL TEL: 4531923/4525235/4528179
MARINE SERVICES LTD. TLX: 212169/212013
1-3 FILELLINON STR
185 36 PIRAEUS

THE ALEXANDRIA TEL: 051-227 2151
TOWING CO. LTD. TLX: 627265 TOWAGE G
CASTLE CHAMBERS
43 CASTLE STREET
LIVERPOOL L2 9TA

ALEXANDRA HOUSE TEL: 0474 - 4227
GRAVESEND TLX: 965558 TOWAGE G
KENT DA12 2DJ

SEMBAWANG TEL: 7583338
MARITIME LTD. FAX: 7523333
ADMIRALTY ROAD EAST TLX: RS36741 SEMTOW
SINGAPORE 2775

TSAVLIRIS GREECE TEL: 4174385/4174975 LAMBRIDIS –
0295 41579
KARAPIPERIS ST. DAY: 4411955/4415860 XENOFORN
CON/NIDIS-3240077

PIRAEUS : 4414244
NIGHT : 4172880 / 4120889
LLOYDS MARITIME TLX: 987321 MR. COTTON-
0206 772277
INORMATON SERV. FAX: 0206 - 46273


FRANGISTAS LONDON TEL: 071 - 4931375 CAPT. N.A.D.
WILJON

LAMNALCO TEL: 971 6 5740123 (24 HRS. CONTACT NO.)
P.O. BOX 5687 FAX: 971 6 5724090
SHARJAH PIC: CAPT. VIVEK BALI (MOB : 971 50 6461152)
U.A.E











4. STS OPERATORS



Company Phone No Fax No
SHELL INTERNTIONAL MARINE
SHELL CENTRE
LONDON SE1 7NA
MRS/21 44 71 934 5220 44 71 934 3046
SHELL TRADING
(MIDDLE EAST)
DUBAI 971 4 3316500 971 4 3321594
LAMNALCO
P.O. BOX - 5687
SHARJAH
CAPT. VIVEK BALI
971 50 6461152 (MOB) 971 65740123 971 6 5724090
GULF AGENCY COMPANY
DUBAI, U.A.E
CAPT. RAYMOND TAYLOR
971 50 6240397 (MOB) 971 4 3457555 971 4 3457202































5. OIL POLLUTION CONSULTANTS/EXPERTS


COMPANY RESPONSIBLE
PERSON NATURE OF SERVICES
OFFERED
MARINE POLLUTION CONTROL
8631 WEST JEFFERSON
DETROIT-MICHIGAN 48209
TEL: 313 849 2333 (24 HRS)
TLX: 230387 RED ANCHOR DE
FAX: 313 849 1623 R. BENSON DISCHARGING
OPERATIONS
COMEX SERVICES
36, BD DES OCEANS
13009 MARSEILLE FRANCE
TEL: 91235000, TLX: 410985, FAX: 91401280 GUY GIEURY -
42202776
D SIMONCINS -
91724584
A LUPI 91228641 DISCHARGING OPERATIONS
GRAHAM MILLER & CO. LTD
229-230 SHOREDITCH HIGH
LONDON E1 6PJ - ENGLAND
TEL: 71 3750471, TLX: 884132 MILOVR G
FAX: 71 3752040/2041 G. BRYANT -
0277899352
D. GARRETT-
0732773259 SURVEY AND
REMOVAL OF OIL FROM
ENVIRONMENTAL
THREAT
AUTOSTAR
P.O.BOX 236K-HAYMARKET
NSW 2000 - AUSTRALIA
TEL: 61 2 9763042, FAX: 61 2 9763043 E. ANDREWS -
6129763042 OIL RECOVERY
EXPERTS
OIL SPILL SERVICE CENTRE
LOWER WILLIAM STR-NORTHM
SOUTHAMPTON SO1 1QE-U.K.
TEL: 703 331551, TLX: 477445, FAX: 703331972 DAVID SALT
ROBIN PERRY CLEAN-UP OPERATIONS
MURRAY FENTON & AS. LTD.
48 HIGH STREET
SOUTHAMPTON-HANTS S010AS
TEL: 703 229787
TLX: 291253 MURFEN G, FAX: 703 339221 CAPT. J. NOBLE
0703 790395
A.T.STANLEY
081 3999504 OIL POLL./WRECK
REMOVAL
CONSULTANTS
MURRAY FENTON (M.EAST) LTD.
P.O.BOX 5203
DUBAI, U.A.E
TEL: 971 - 4 – 3351900
(24 HRS. CONTACT NO.)
FAX: 971 - 4 – 3353107, TLX: 46056 MFC CAPT.
R.R.CRUMP
I T O P F
STAPLE HALL -STONEHOUSE
COURT 87-90 HOUNDSDITCH
LONDON EC3A 7AX
TEL: 44 171 621 1255, 44 142 691 4112 (OUT-OFHOURS),
FAX: 44 171 621 1783 I. WHITE
H. PARKER
T. MOLLER
EAST ASIA RESPONSE PTE LTD.
2, JALAN SAMULUN
SINGAPORE
TEL: 2661566, 2661562/2665362, FAX: 2662312 DAVID SALT
BRENT PYBURN
FAIRDEAL SHIPPING
P.O. BOX – 11319, KALBA, U.A.E
TEL : 971 9 2777300, FAX : 971 9 2778383
TLX : 89007 FMS KLB EM MR. ABDULLA
SULEIMAN
971 50 6291138
(MOB)





6. SALVAGE ASSOCIATION CONTACTS




COUNTRY TEL FAX TLX
BELGIUM
(ANTWERP) 32 3 232 8682 32 3 231 9842 3144 (ESAY B)
FRANCE
(MARSEILLE) 33 91 56 1458 9199 2276 94017708 (SAMA G)
GERMANY
(HAMBURG) 49 40 322 687 040 338 437 94019691 (SAGE G)
GREECE
(PIRAEUS) 301 452 2723 301 457 0467 212312 (SALV GR)
ITALY (GENOA) 39 10 540 848 010 553 3134 270656 (WRECKA I)
NETHERLANDS
(ROTTERDAM) 31 10 4260 122 010 425 3155 94018171 (SANL G)
PORTUGAL
(LISBON) 351 1 486 7388 01 486 7380 44278 (WRECK P)
UNITED KINGDOM
(LONDON) 44 71 623 1299 44 71 626 4963 94017187
SOUTH AFRICA
(DURBAN) 27 31 305 3856 031 304 7821 94018418 (SASA G)
UNITED ARAB
EMIRATES (DUBAI) 971 4 3313 100 971 4 3314 121
HONG KONG 852 525 3619 810 6229 94019749 (SAHK G)
JAPAN
(YOKOHAMA) 81 45 201 3734 045 201987 94019069 (SAJPG)
SINGAPORE 65 220 8355 65 225 8879 RS 21108 (SASNGPR)
USA
(NEW YORK) 1 212 785 1720 1 212 785 1732 62170420 (ESL UD)
CANADA
(MONTREAL) 1 514 849 2207 1 514 849 6661 050 67


















APPENDIX B
PORT SPECIFIC INFORMATION


(Master must obtain details concerning local reporting procedures upon arriving in port and complete)


LIST OF PORTS FREQUENTLY VISITED



PORT CONTACT PERSON CONTACTS






























APPENDIX C
PORT CONTACTS

(Master must obtain details concerning local reporting procedures upon arriving in port and complete)

PORT NAME :
LOCAL AGENT: NAME: _______________________________
ADDRESS: _______________________________
_______________________________
PHONE: _______________________________
FAX: _______________________________
MOBILE: _______________________________
TELEX: _______________________________
E-MAIL: _______________________________

LOCAL P & I REP NAME: _______________________________
ADDRESS: _______________________________
_______________________________
PHONE: _______________________________
FAX: _______________________________
MOBILE: _______________________________
TELEX: _______________________________
E-MAIL: _______________________________

OTHER LOCAL CONTACTS NAME: _______________________________
ADDRESS: _______________________________
_______________________________
PHONE: _______________________________
FAX: _______________________________
MOBILE: _______________________________
TELEX: _______________________________
E-MAIL: _______________________________

24 HOURS CONTACT:
LOAD / DISCHARGE TERMINAL:


COMPANY NAME PHONE FAX TELEX E-MAIL




COMMENTS:
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________



APPENDIX C
PORT CONTACTS


Introduction: ______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________


Notifications: ______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________


Potential Oil Spill Sites: __________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________


Facility Operators: __________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________


Oil Spill Removal Organization (OSRO): _____________________________________


Spill Removal Organization: __________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________


Oil Spill Response Resources: ___________________________________________

The following equipment and personnel are available: _________________________

Containment / Protective Boom: ___________________________________________

Oil Recovery Equipment: __________________________________________________

Personnel Resource: ________________________________________________________

Temporary Oil Storage: __________________________________________________

Miscellaneous Equipment: __________________________________________________

Deployment Equipment: __________________________________________________




APPENDIX D
SHIP OWNER INFORMATION



OWNER
------------------------------------------
MANAGING COMPANY

---------------------------------------

DESIGNATED PERSON ASHORE

-------------------------------------------

















APPENDIX E
DAMAGE STABILITY DATA


The operator’s Head Office Technical Department will perform the necessary damage stability calculations.


Typical Information Required for Data Entry

The following plans and data are examples of what is required to prepare the ship computer model and for reference during a response. A copy of each plan is available with the operators office along with a copy of the same onboard the vessel. :


Plans:

Lines Plan.
General Arrangement.
Capacity Plan.
Midship Section.
Shell Expansion.
Hydrostatic Table.
Cross Curves of Stability.
Transverse Bulkheads.
Vents and Overflows.
Piping and pumping diagrams for bilge, ballast, lub oil and fuel oil systems.
Sounding Tables.
Construction Profile and Decks Plan.


Data:

Lightship weight distribution curve.
Lightship weight longitudinal centre of gravity (LCG).
Lightship weight vertical centre of gravity (VCG).
Ballast and Bilge Pump Curves.


Booklets:

Trim and Stability

Owner shall ensure that all the above information is available on board the ship. The captain of the vessel should check that the above mentioned documents/information is available on board.




APPENDIX E
DAMAGE STABILITY DATA


Typical Shipboard Information Required

Vessel condition Immediately before Casualty:

Drafts (forward and aft)
Loading condition: Tank compartment identification with specific gravity of liquid and weight.


After Casualty:

Nature of casualty (collision, grounding, fire, explosion, heavy weather, other)
Time, date and geographic position.
Weather, tide and forecast.
Drafts (forward and aft).
Angle of heel and trim.
Details of each damaged compartment open to the sea.
Structural damage.
Estimate of fuel loss.
Onboard actions being taken.
Soundings around vessel if applicable and S.G. of surrounding water.


























APPENDIX F
SUMMARY FLOW CHART

This flow diagram is an outline of the course of action that shipboard personnel should follow in responding to an oil pollution emergency based on the guidelines published by IMO. This diagram is not exhaustive and should not be used as a sole reference in response. The steps are designed to assist ship personnel in actions to stop or minimize the discharge of oil and mitigate its effects. These steps fall into two main categories – reporting and action.



























































APPENDIX G
REFERENCES



1. Manual on Oil Pollution, Section-II – Contingency Planning [IMO].


2. Response to Marine Oil Spills [ITOPF].


3. Provisions Concerning the Reporting of Incidents Involving Harmful Substances under MARPOL 73/78 [IMO].


4. International Safety Guide for Oil Tankers and Terminals.


5. Peril at Sea and Salvage – A guide for Masters [ICS/OCIMF].


6. Ship to Ship Transfer Guide (Petroleum) [ICS/OCIMF].


7. Guidelines for the Preparation of Shipboard Oil Spill Contingency Plans [OCIMF/ITOPF].

























APPENDIX H
INITIAL NOTIFICATION

IMO Format for Initial Notification Message

AA Ship name, call sign, MMSI, flag

BB Date and time of event, UTC (D-D-H-H-M-M)

CC Position, Lat., Long. (d-d-m-m N/S, d-d-d-m-m- E/W) or

DD Bearing, distance from landmark (d-d-d, N mil)

EE True course (d-d-d)

FF Speed, knots (kn-kn-1/10) at the time of the incident

LL Intended track

MM Radio station(s) guarded (VHF, MF SSB, HF SSB)

NN Date and time of next report, UTC (D-D-H-H-M-M)

OO Draft in meters and centimeters (m-m-cm-cm)

PP Type and quantity of cargo/bunkers on board

QQ Brief details of defects/deficiencies/damage. (The condition of the vessel and the
Ability to transfer cargo bunkers or ballast must be included.)

RR Brief details of pollution, including estimate of quantity lost, the type of cargo /fuel,
if the discharge is continuing, estimated movement and area of the oil spill.

SS Brief details of weather and sea conditions

TT Contact details of ship’s owner/operator/agent

UU Ship size and type:
Length: (m) Breadth: (m) Depth: (m) Tonnage: Type:

XX Additional information
- Brief details of incident
- need for outside assistance
- Actions being taken
- Number of crew and details of any injuries
- Details of P&I Club & local correspondent
- Mobile telephone number
- Other



APPENDIX H
INITIAL NOTIFICATION
Telex / Fax Message Form (Page 1 of 2)


AA

BB (day and time of event, UTC)


D D H H M M

CC (position, latitude, longitude) or DD (bearing, distance from land mark)




d d m m N S d d d N miles




From : ______________________________
d d d m m E W

EE (course) FF (speed, knots)


d d d Kn Kn 1/10

LL (intended track)


MM (radio station(s) guarded)


NN (day and time of next report, UTC)




D D H H M M

OO (draft)




m m cm cm


PP (type and quantity of cargo/bunkers on board)






APPENDIX H
INITIAL NOTIFICATION
Telex / Fax Message Form (Page 2 of 2)

QQ (brief details of defects/deficiencies/damage)


RR ______________________ (brief details of pollution, including estimate of quantity lost)


SS ____________________________________ (brief details of weather and sea conditions)


WIND direction _________________________
speed _________________________

SEA direction __________________________
height (m) __________________________


TT (contact details of ship’s owner/operator/agent)


UU (ship size and type)

Length: (m) Breadth: (m) Depth : (m) Tonnage : Type :


XX (additional information)

Brief details of incident:

Need for outside assistance:

Actions being taken:

Number of crew and details of any injuries:

Details of P&I club and local correspondent:

Mobile telephone number:

Others:





APPENDIX H
INITIAL NOTIFICATION
Telex / Fax Message Form (Page 1 of 2)
AA

BB (day and time of event, UTC)

2 9 1 1 5 0
D D H H M M

CC (position, latitude, longitude) or DD (bearing, distance from land mark)

1 1 3 0 N


d d m m N S d d d N miles


5 1 3 E

From : ______________________________
d d d m m E W

EE (course) FF (speed, knots)
1 3 7 1 0 0

d d d Kn Kn 1/10

LL (intended track)


MM (radio station(s) guarded)
VHF CHANNEL 16


NN (day and time of next report, UTC)

2 9 1 2 3 0


D D H H M M

OO (draft)

0 6 0 0


m m cm cm


PP (type and quantity of cargo/bunkers on board)
490 TEU LOADED CONTAINER ONBOARD







APPENDIX H
INITIAL NOTIFICATION
Telex / Fax Message Form (Page 2 of 2)

QQ (brief details of defects/deficiencies/damage)
COLLISION WITH CARGO SHIP WHITE SKY, DAMAGE IN NO. 42 TANK AREA

RR APPROX. 5 TONS OF F.O FROM NO.42 TANK OUT FLOW. (brief details of pollution,
including estimate of quantity lost)

SS WEATHER IS FINE AND SEA IS CALM (brief details of weather and sea conditions)

WIND direction NW

speed 8 Kn

SEA direction NW

height (m) 1.00

TT (contact details of ship’s owner/operator/agent)

UU (ship size and type)
162.43 m 25.00 m 13.80 m 16,166 GENERAL CARGO
Length : (m) Breadth : (m) Depth : (m) Tonnage : Type :

XX (additional information)

Brief details of incident: COLLISION WITH A CARGO SHIP WHITE SKY, NEAR NO.42 TANK AREA, CAUSING LOSS OF APPROX. 5 TONS OF DIESEL F.O.

Need for outside assistance: NOW THE SITUATION IS UNDER CONTROL, NO NEED OF ASSISTANCE

Actions being taken: F.O IN THE TANK HAS BEEN TRANSFERRED IMMEDIATELY TO TANK NO. 12, NOW THERE IS NO OIL LEAKAGE

Number of crew and details of any injuries: NO

Details of P&I club and local correspondent:

Mobile telephone number:

Others: ----






APPENDIX I
TANK CAPACITIES


NOTE: SEE CAPACITY PLAN


(NOTE: FOR LOCATION SEE CAPACITY PLAN DRAWING ATTACHED.THE PLAN IS AVAILABLE ONBOARD THE VESSEL FOR VERIFICATION OF CREW)






































APPENDIX K
DRILL / EXERCISE LOG




Date Location Participants Remarks































APPENDIX L
CLEAN – UP EQUIPMENT


LOCATION:

BOAT DECK STBD SIDE

EQUIPMENTS ONBOARD

SAW DUST
OIL RAGS
SCOOPS
CHEMICAL
SOVELS
































APPENDIX M
LIST OF DRAWINGS



1. GENERAL ARRANGEMENT PLAN
2. CAPACITY PLAN
3. MIDSHIP SECTION DRAWING
4. PIPING DIAGRAM

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